Okutama forest history

The Wise Man

Posted on Updated on

See below for Japanese translation

The wise man loves karaoke. He shows off the sets installed in the makeshift karaoke annex that he built next to his home. The history of karaoke is all there, with cassette tapes, 12” laser disks and a range of players. It’s a love, and his neighborhood friends join him regularly for evenings of singing, jollity, drinking and gossip.
He’s in his heaven. Today, however, the conversation turns to the history of our part of Okutama. We have noticed, in the Japanese cedar forests that blanket the slopes above our home, ancient wires hanging from trees 20m in height. These are single wires, rusted and brittle, that seem to descend from the crowns of these trees?
The wise man, who spent his early years as a timber-getter, explains that in the old days, when this timber had value, the owners attached such wires so that they could pull the young trees straight after heavy snows. Bent trees have no value. Every spring, workers would trudge through the snow levering those wires, which were bound at the lower end to adjacent trees, in order to shake off burdensome snow and allow the trees to straighten.
Timber was big business before WWII, but then cheaper imports dominated the market and in the early 1960s the man had to leave in search of other employment.
With the market for sugi and hinoki timber went the market for the bark of these straight and true trees, which was a fine roofing material with a life of 15 years or so.
Edauchi115d copy

Now he is back, long-retired, and with a home that is a monument to the traditional lifestyle. The house is surrounded by neat, impressive woodpiles.
photo

He says he prefers the wood-fired bath to the gas-fired contraption in the main building. He likes to make soba noodles from dough that he prepares himself.

image

photo(2)

Near the karaoke den is an open storage shed for various gardening tools and materials, with an open faucet overflowing a sink with clear water. Is that not a waste? Yes, it is not. The homeowner explains that he maintains a spring some 300m up the mountain, linked by pipelineto a tank near the house that supplies all household water with plenty to spare. Such arrangements are increasingly scarce, but not unknown in our extended village.

photo(1)

Our next question regards abandoned antennae found here and there on the slopes. I found one recently on a ridge a couple of hundred meters above Ome-kaido. Our friend explains that in the early days of TV (after 1953) the reception in this area was somewhat fickle. Some people went to great trouble and expense to elevate the receivers.
The wise man has family roots going back several centuries in this area, and he provides a keen insight into why so many people in the Okutama area share surnames. There are so many Harashimas, Hamanos and Shimizus that it seems everyone in the district must be related, and is especially odd in a nation of over 100,000 surnames. The elegant explanation here (I have no historical verification as yet) is that when the Meiji government decreed in 1875 that even commoners must register a surname, many people simply imitated their neighbors. Later, some adopted trade names to avoid confusion. Today, then, many locals who share the same family name have no traceable family links at all.
In the Meiji, Taisho and early Showa areas the local economy was robust, with timber, agriculture and limestone quarrying. The postwar period, however, was particularly harsh on the lumber industry. Overwhelmed by imports, the value of a 30-year-old sugi tree now is less than 500 yen, nowhere near commercial viability.
This becomes a serious problem, the wise one explains, not only here but nationwide, as sugi trees begin flowering around 30 years of age. The pollen they produce causes debilitating hay fever for weeks at a time every spring. In the old days, harvesting kept up with a 30-year cycle, and hay fever was almost unknown. It began increasing sharply in the mid-1960s. These days about 90% of the trees are mature. Pollen from sugi and hinoki affects about 20% of the population of Japan.
The wise man did not offer a solution.

And here is the expert translation

好々爺はカラオケが大好き。彼の自宅の敷地内に自分で離れを建て、カラオケセットをはめ込んでいる。カラオケの歴史を物語るといっても語弊がないような、当初のカセットテープ、レーザーディスク、プレーヤーなどがずらり。楽しい。夜な夜な近所の友達が集まり、飲めや歌えやで大騒ぎ。

気分は最高だ。ところが、今日は奥多摩の歴史を紐解くこととなった。

筆者が住む家の裏山の斜面は、杉に覆われている。高さが20mもあろうか、杉の木から古いワイヤーがぶら下がっているのに気づいた。1本のワイヤーで、錆びて脆くなって杉の木のてっぺんから下がっているように見える。

若かりし頃、山仕事で生計をたてていた好々爺曰く、それは積雪の後にその重みで倒れた若い杉の木を真っ直ぐに引っ張るために、森の持ち主がワイヤーを取り付けた。木の値段が高く商品価値があったのだ。曲がってしまった木は売れない。毎春雪の積もった山に入り、近くの他の木の根元に止めてあるワイヤーを引っ張り、雪の重みに耐えかねた杉の木々を引っ張り上げ、元のように真っ直ぐにしたのだ。第二次大戦前は、木材は大きな事業だった。しかし、その後、輸入木材に席巻され、1960年代初めにはその職を離れることとなった。

杉や檜(ひのき)の需要と同じくして、その外皮(バーク)の需要もあり、屋根の素材として15年程もつとされた。

好々爺は、伝統的な日本様式そのものといった家でリタイヤ生活を送って久しい。きちんと長さを揃えて切った薪が、家を囲っている。薪で焚いたお風呂は最高だ。特注の高価なユニットバスは使ってもいない。

カラオケの離れに隣接する小屋には、畑で使う道具がところ狭しと並んでいる。脇にはシンクが備え付けられ、水が蛇口から溢れ出ている。もったいなくはないか?いや、そんなことはない。裏山の300m程登ったところから湧き水を引き、一旦タンクに貯め、それでも使い切れない分が出ているのだと言う。このような設備は、だんだんと珍しいものになってきたが、この村ではみんなが共同で作り上げたものだ。

次の質問は山道のあちらこちらにある放置されたアンテナ。青梅街道から2〜300m上がった尾根に見つけた。テレビが来た頃、ちょうど1953年くらいか、この辺りは電波の受信が悪かったために大きなレシーバーを山の頂上に設置した。その後、各自が家に取り付けていたアンテナはお役御免となったのである。

好々爺はこの地域では何代も前から続く家に生まれた。なぜにこの地域は同じ苗字が多いのか?

10万も苗字があるというのに。彼の見解では(筆者はまだ歴史的立証はしていないのだが)、明治政府が1875年に平民も苗字を登記するように命じ、多くの平民が隣近所の名前を真似て自分達の名前を決めてしまったのだ。当時、五軒組と呼ばれる隣組ができ、葬儀の時などは協力しあったという。そのような中、同じ名前の隣近所を区別するために屋号が取り入れられた。今でも屋号で呼び合う家々も存在する。そして現在、各地方で、血縁関係もない家族が同じ苗字を名乗って存在するのは、このようなことが原因と考えられる。

明治、大正、そして昭和初期は地方経済は木材、農業、石灰の採石で潤っていた。しかし、戦後、特に木材関連の産業が厳しい状況に追い込まれた。輸入木材が主流となり、今では30年経った杉の木1本が500円にもならない。近場でさばける可能性もない。

このことは奥多摩のみならず、全国的な問題となった、と好々爺は嘆く。杉は30年で花をつける。その花粉が、毎春ある一定期間に多くの人を悩ます花粉症の原因となる。昔は30年周期で杉の伐採を行い、売買され、花粉症などなかった。顕著に現れたのは1960年代中頃。当時は90%の杉が花粉をばらまいた。日本人の20%が杉と檜の花粉に悩むという。これに対しての結論は好々爺から聞くことはなかった。

image

photo(2)

Advertisements